« Jobs - Obtaining a Working Visa for Japan | Main | Lesson Planning - Beefing up the ESL Textbook »

April 27, 2006

Living on a Budget – Extra Sources of Income

Dear Readers,

Let’s face it, few people go into ESL to make money, but when you’re being paid a pittance by your academy to work your socks off, you might start wondering why you didn’t choose a more lucrative career.

So why not think of alternative sources of income to top-up your pay? For most teachers this may mean taking private classes, an unpredictable venture at the best of times, and one that could get you in trouble with your employer if your visa depends on their sponsorship . . .

. . . Looking further afield, you may be able to unearth a few part-time jobs that will not only boost your income but help you see a new side of the country you’re living in. Bar work is a time-honoured example. Go find your nearest Irish bar (come on, they’re everywhere!) and pester the boss.

If your language skills are up to scratch, why not offer translations? Try the local bars and restaurants – they may be keen for you to translate their menu properly. Local newspapers may also appreciate an English-speaking staff member.

In a place where native English speakers are at a premium, you can suddenly find yourself in demand for all sorts of strange things. One of the best jobs I ever applied for was as a voice-over artist. So be imaginative, check out the classifieds today and let us know what you find!

Do you have a legally "alternate" source of income outside of your TESL employment? Please let us know in the comment box below (we promise to keep you anonymous!).

Best wishes,

Jon Yeomans
April 2006 Guest-Writer for ESLemployment

Looking for MORE articles about living on a budget as an ESL teacher? Click HERE!

-----------
About the author of this entry:
Jon Yeomans is an English teacher from Coventry in England and has taught students of all levels and ages in the UK, Spain, Japan and Sweden. He gained a first class degree in History from the University of London and holds a TESOL certificate in teaching. Aside from ESL work has also worked in private businesses and as a civil servant for the British Government. For two years he worked part-time writing news stories for a health website called Netdoctor. He is keenly interested in writing and travelling and devotes as much to these activities as he can.

Posted by ESL Lesson Plan at April 27, 2006 06:01 AM

Trackback Pings

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.esl-lesson-plan.com/mt-tb.cgi/152

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Living on a Budget – Extra Sources of Income:

» Living On A Budget - Accomodations from ESL Lesson Plan
Quick! What’s the number one reason that most ESL teachers decide to go to another country to teach? If you think that it’s to experience another culture and see the world, you’re right! But many teachers find that, because of the low salaries... [Read More]

Tracked on April 27, 2006 08:40 AM

» Living on a Budget - The Hows and Whys from ESL Lesson Plan
We all know that teachers need to live on a budget. The problem is that most of us try to keep a ‘running tab’ in our heads, and then call it a budget. Guess what? It doesn’t work! If you want to get serious about making the most of your teach... [Read More]

Tracked on April 27, 2006 08:43 AM

» Living on a Budget – Free Movie Rentals? from ESL Lesson Plan
Living abroad? On a budget? Love to watch movies or read? Spend too much money on entertainment (a standard movie ticket in Japan is approximately $17 US!)? It’s time to checkout your local library! Ok, so maybe this seems like pointing out the obvi... [Read More]

Tracked on April 27, 2006 08:47 AM

» Living on a Budget – Making Ends Meet from ESL Lesson Plan
Jobs vary but about 2 million seems about average considering other perks such as a housing allowance, health care, and travel reimbursement. Some foreigners are here to pay off student loans and others make enough doing privates to do distance learni... [Read More]

Tracked on May 26, 2006 01:16 PM

Comments

Post a comment




Remember Me?

(you may use HTML tags for style)